Nashbar Cyclocross Review: Alloy Sora Cyclocross Bike vs. Alloy 105 Cyclocro


When talking about Cyclocross and different bike brands, one name is basically unavoidable – Nashbar.

The company is one of the most respected in the industry and Nashbar Cyclocross line of bikes has been regarded as possibly the best cost-effective alternative to professional bikes.

While these bikes are noticeably lighter than your average Cyclocross bike, they are still designed to be sturdy enough to be driven in a number of different terrains.

Since Cyclocrossing involves both on-road and off-road cycling, Nashbar bikes are designed to cater to both of these terrains.

If you ask any Cyclocross enthusiast for a recommendation, two names usually popup: the Alloy Sora and the Alloy 105.

Both are outstanding Cyclocross bikes with outstanding features that have many similarities. But they are also unique in many, many ways.

The question is, which of them is better for you? If you want to know the answer, read along…

Nashbar Cyclocross Buyers Guide Video


Nashbar Alloy Sora Cyclocross Bike

Nashbar Alloy Sora Cyclocross Bike

What kind of benefits the Alloy Sora gives the rider? For starters, it offers a good, solid frame that will last you for years. It makes this Nashbar Cyclocross bike good for almost any weather condition. You won’t have to worry about getting your frame wet or muddy.

Nashbar Alloy Sora Cyclocross BikeThe best thing about it, however, is its versatility. With the Nashbar Alloy Sora, one you can go down to your local park, and take the bike around for a few spins on the concrete path. The next day, you can take it to a mountain path, and ride it uphill if you want.

At the heart of the Sora is an A6-SL aluminum frame. The material makes the bike durable without being overweight. Although, we should mention, that the Sora is noticeably heavier than the other bike we’re looking at here. However, we’ll talk about that later.

When we’re looking at the components, this bike is actually comparable to the jam-packed Shimano Sora. There’s the 2-9 speed shifter that allows you to change your gears in a matter of milliseconds. You also have the FSA Omega crankset with 50-35T chainrings.

Couple all of that with a nine-speed cassette, and you’ve got a gear ration that allows you to glide across the smooth terrain in one moment, and scale a steep ascent the next. The brakes are far from perfect, but you shouldn’t worry about them too much, because they will definitely stop you in place when needed.

Sora Cyclocross Pros

• The A6-SL frame is pretty stiff and is extremely durable
• The carbon-fiber fork and steering wheel make navigation easy
• The bike costs significantly less than the Nashbar Alloy 105
• The quality shift leavers guarantee smooth gear changes
• The frame of the bike is vibration-resistant, which makes for a comfy ride

Sora Cyclocross Cons

• Less aerodynamic than your average bike due to wider tires and frame
• The Alloy Sora is heavier than the Alloy 105, which makes it less safe
• It slower than your average bike on off-road surfaces

For more information and current prices. CLICK HERE


Nashbar Alloy 105 Cyclocross Bike

Nashbar Alloy 105 Cyclocross Bike

The Nashbar Alloy 105 may be made out of the same material as the Sora, however, due to fewer accessories, it’s actually lighter. So while you don’t get the same accessories, you can expect more freedom to maneuver when you drive. We also have to tell a few words about the FC770 carbon fiber.

Nashbar Alloy 105 Cyclocross BikeIn the last few years, steel has been making a comeback. We understand – the material gives the bike a simple, retro look. Plus, some riders are attracted by the nostalgia factor. With that being said, if you’re a performance-oriented driver, you should go for a carbon fiber bike.

The maneuverability it provides, in along with the durability of the material, allows you to enter competition after competition without worrying about your bike getting stuck in the mud or making you lose control during the ride.

Aesthetically, the Alloy 105 looks more than fine. The frame design is pretty inspired. Basically, the bike has that old school look, without seeming outdated. It has a stripped down design that works for both urban and rural settings. You can even use the bike for commuting if you want to show off.

Some people have complained before that the bike’s wheels, while top quality, and are not actually true to size. If you have any doubts about this, you should just go to your local bike shop and check to see if everything fine. Of course, if you have to know, you can check everything by yourself.

Alloy 105 Pros

• The mechanical disc brakes work in all weather conditions
• The 11-speed cassette makes uphill rides easier than ever
• The design, while not unique, is pretty inspired and visually appealing
• The bike works great for both rural and urban settings
• The cables are routed externally, which makes the maintenance seamless

Alloy 105 Cons

• It costs a few hundred dollars more than the Nashbar Alloy Sora
• The breaks are far from perfect and won’t allow you to stop instantly in your tracks
• The saddle is not all that comfortable during long distance rides

For more information and current prices. CLICK HERE


Alloy Sora Cyclocross Bike vs. Alloy 105 Cyclocross

Alloy Sora Cyclocross Bike vs. Alloy 105 Cyclocross

As we mentioned before, these two Nashbar Cyclocross bikes are pretty similar in certain ways. After all, they come from the same manufacturer. But if you read our reviews carefully, you’ve noticed that there are some differences.

The Nashbar Alloy Sora, with its sleek design, fits more causal rider perfectly. It’s pretty comfortable, so if you enjoy taking long distance rides and want to enjoy the scenery during the ride, this should be your pick. Sora’s design and weak breaks don’t really lend themselves to competitive riders.

And then we have the Alloy 105. People who like entering amateur competitions should have a field day with this bike. Both the agile steering mechanism and the large wheels allow you to go up and down mountain trails without any issues whatsoever.

For more information and current prices. CLICK HERE


Final Thoughts

So which one of these will suit your better? As you’ve seen, both the Alloy Sora and the Alloy 105 have their own benefits and drawbacks. The truth is that there’s no definitive answer. Both of them work for different people, with different needs, in different situations…

The Sora, for instance, works better for people who use their bikes to go to work and enjoy going for longer rides in the wild. On the other hand, the Alloy 105 is meant for people who drive competitively and consider bike riding more than a hobby.

When choosing which one of these Nashbar Cyclocross bikes to go with, you should take all of those factors into consideration. Re-examine your bike riding habits, think about your goals, and you’ll be able to make a pick easily. Good luck with your choice and we hope we helped you with it.

What are you thoughts?

Please leave a comment in the comment section.

Thanks!
-pedalSwift


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